June Yun

Transforming appreciation into visual forms
Transforming appreciation into visual forms

June Yun is a Vancouver-based artist. She was born in China and educated at the Central Academy of Fine Art in Beijing. Then she lived and studied Fine Art in UK, received a Master of Fine Art degree from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. She has taught art in Anqing university, Macau Polytechnic Institute and Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

Yun has exhibited internationally since 2000. In UK: Hatton Gallery, Newcastle Upon Tyne; Durham Oriental Museum; Atkinson Gallery,Somerset; Global art gallery in Newcastle; Manchester Art Center, Kings College London; Washington Art Centre; Galerie Du Tableau, Marseille, France; In Canada, she had installation shows in Banff Centre, Richmond Art Gallery; video installation show in Centre A and three solo exhibitions in Lipont Gallery in Richmond ; In China, Shanghai Himalaya Art museum, Shang Shang contemporary Art Gallery in Xiamen. Also she has received a few art grants from Canada Council for the Arts and BC Arts Council for Professional Visual Arts. She has participated several international artist residencies, such as Banff Centre, Shanghai Himalaya Museum and Art Council England funded an art project in Goa, India, etc. In the summer of 2016 She participated the “Big Print Project” with Chinese Canadian and Indigenous artists celebrating the art of large-scale woodcut print-making using a steamroller, funded by city Vancouver. 2018, her painting “Wuhu 03” has been selected by “Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series competition” in North America, as one of the 100 finalists, and exhibition at the Gallery Jones in Vancouver.

June Yun’s artwork builds on the edge of Eastern and Western cultures. Through her life and travel experiences from East to West, and then looking back at the East, she transforms her appreciations and concepts into visual forms: oil painting, drawing, video and installation. Those framed thoughts are sublimates of her inside words and passions, made more simple and quiet in their external form.